BAR 018 CD

Christoph Heemann began his sound experimentations in 1983 with his project ‘Hirsche Nicht Aufs Sofa’ (HNAS). The music of HNAS was characterised by a blending of noise, minimal music, musique concrete and progressive rock. The sound language created by this fusion was alienating, yet humorous. Heemann’s third CD ‘Days of the Eclipse’ documents his recent works with natural sounds, acoustic instruments, and studio electronics in a sound collage which  refers to natural, organic processes. The musical structures are multilayered and develop in an organic way, which flow into other implied structures.

Christoph Heemann began his sound experimentations in 1983 with his project Hirsche Nicht Aufs Sofa (HNAS). The music of HNAS was characterised by a blending of noise, minimal music, musique concrete and progressive rock. The sound language created by this fusion was alienating, yet humorous. The 8 albums that HNAS released until their split in 1992 are considered surreal underground classics and much sought after collector’s items.

Besides his work with HNAS, Heemann has collaborated with David Jackman (Organum), Masami Akita (Merzbow) and Edward Ka-spel (Legendary Pink Dots) to mention but a few. His first solo-CD ‘Unsichtbare Barriere’ (‘Invisible Barrier’ on Extreme) was released in 1993. This was his first full-length electro-acoustic piece showing his growing interest in contemporary music and was received with critical acclaim.

Heemann’s second CD ‘Aftersolstice’ (Barooni) documents his recent works with natural sounds, acoustic instruments, and studio electronics in a sound collage which  refers to natural, organic processes. On one level ‘Aftersolstice’ deals with the perception and the experience of time. The musical structures are multilayered and develop in an organic way, which flow into other implied structures.

Starting with an orchestral prologue (‘Solstice’), ‘Aftersolstice’ moves into static moods, frozen moments in time (‘IV’). At first the only suggestion of movement is one of looking at an object from different perspectives. Slowly a process of movement seems to take place, although the sound sources in the many organically changing structures seem to disintegrate; electronic sounds slowly shift past natural sounds, bells, water flowing, and suddenly a voice appears. It becomes clear that ‘IV’ can also be listened to as a corridor, a phase in time that one has to go through to enter the next one. In ‘I’ a different approach can be heard, each musical element that is introduced leads automaticaly to the next one, each group of sounds is in transition. The disintegration of ‘IV’ is slowly transformed to a transparent structure. The piece springs to life with an unsettling, deranged piece for 80 violins. And then suddenly there is silence, the sound of dripping water (‘Apendix’), and the appearance of unearthly qualities.

Christoph Heemann has always been concerned with the visual quality of sound. While composing his music Heemann is strongly influenced by the images and colours that come to his mind in relation to different sounds and sound combinations. Heemann’s music is rich in sound sources and in ‘Aftersolstice’ he tries to combine the expressive qualities of natural sounds with instrumental and electronic music as well as referring to the sound of 70′s electronics, contemporary music, concrete sounds and repetitive structures to create a style that defies categorization. In an increasingly more personal language, Christoph Heemann conveys his deeply rooted commitment to new music.